Monday, December 18, 2017




Today's Best Mansionwww.todaysbestmansionsforsale.com

It's lavish. It's huge. It's grand. It's expensive

#1     1894 North Stanley Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90046 with 5 bedrooms, 7 baths and 10,700 sq.ft. is listed for sale at $38,000,000.

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

Imagine all the stars aligned and the view gods and rock gods came together to build their last homage to the legendary Sunset Strip. Lautner, Goldstein, Sinatra and Jimi Hendrix would all give their nod to The Stanley House. Perched like an eagle's nest on the #1 promontory view lot in the city hovering just above The City of Angels with the ultimate privacy and explosive 270° views that you can reach out and kiss. Presenting the most masterful mid-century modern paradise everconstructed. The only budget was there was no budget; everything had to be the best.Architecture from XTEN's Austin Kelly's last swan song and Lenny Kravitz of Kravitz Design as Creative Director & Interiors. Art installation by RETNA. The list goes on and on with the finest customization and, to top it all off, your very own night club "disco Volante" that will take you to space and back. Don't miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity this will never happen again here is your chance to own the stairway to heaven. 

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046



1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

1894 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046

Today's Top San Diego Luxury Estates.


The median home value in San Diego County is $555,800. San Diego County home values have gone up 6.2% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 2.7% within the next year
The median home value in Coronado is $1,529,100. Coronado home values have gone up 3.6% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 1.4% within the next year. 

The median home value in La Jolla, 92037 is $1,532,000. 92037 home values have gone up  4.7% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 2.1% within the next year.

The median home value in Solona Beach, 92075 is $1,297,500. 92075 home values have declined -0.8% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 2.0% within the next year.  


The median home value in Del Mar, 92014 is $1,613,200. 92014 home values have gone up 0.7% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 0.5% within the next year. 

The median home value in Rancho Santa Fe is $2,650,800. Rancho Santa Fe home values have gone up 0.8% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 0.9% within the next year.

#1      320 1st Street, Coronado, CA 92118 with 4 bedrooms, 7 baths and 5,476 sq.ft. 
is listed for sale at $6,500,000.

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118


Enduring in Quality. Strong and Sturdy. Steel framed. Granite walls surround this luxurious custom "Georgian" style home with custom designed iron fencing. Gorgeous marbles blend with solid mahogany woods, antique mantels & crystal chandeliers. A spectacular outdoor kitchen and stunning saltwater pool. Wine cellar Elevator to all floors. Amazing views of downtown skyline and San Diego Bay. 2 Car Garage Auto Lift! 50 yr asphalt shingle roof.

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

320 1st St, Coronado, CA 92118

Today's Top LA Luxury Estate.


The median home value in Orange County is $692,900. Orange County home values have gone up 4.0% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 0.5% within the next year. 

The median home value in Los Angeles County is $576,900. Los Angeles County home values have gone up 6.6% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 1.2% within the next year.

The median home value in Newport Beach is $1,654,500. Newport Beach home values have gone up 1.5% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 0.6% within the next year. 

The median home value in Santa Monica is $1,401,400. Santa Monica home values have gone up 0.2% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will fall -0.3% within the next year

The median home value in 90049 is $2,404,100. 90049 home values have declined -0.8% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will fall -1.2% within the next year.

The median home value in Pacific Palisades is $2,743,900. Pacific Palisades home values have gone up 3.7% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 0.5% within the next year.

The median home value in Malibu is $2,974,700. Malibu home values have gone up 6.6% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 1.0% within the next year.

The median home value in Bel Air is $3,316,000. Bel Air home values have gone up 2.0% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will fall -0.2% within the next year.

The median home value in Beverly Hills, 90210 is $4,890,900. 90210 home values have gone up 4.5% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 0.5% within the next year.

#1      100 Delfern Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90077 with 6 bedrooms, 4 baths 
and 8,751 sq.ft. is listed for sale at $14,995,000.

100 Delfern Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90077


The 7,000-square-foot property was designed in 1938 by architect Paul Williams and Audry Hepburn wasn't the only member of Hollywood royalty to call it home: Mia Farrow, Eva Gabor, and David Niven all lived there during their lifetimes. In fact, the house is officially know as the Eva Gabor Estate and is located in the affluent neighborhood of Holmby Hills. But that's just the start. This estately manor is gated and private with expansive grounds. There are 4 separate structures on the property. The main house is close to 7,000 sq ft. which includes a formal foyer, living room, family room, formal dining room, breakfast room & kitchen. The bedrooms upstairs include a private master suite with a balcony, luxurious bathroom, sitting room, & large walk-in closet. Structure #2 is the living quarter attached to the garage with 2 bathrooms, a living room & a kitchenette. Also attached to the other side of the garage is an office. Structure #3 is the pool house with a living room, kitchenette, bathroom & walk-in closet. Structure #4 is the green house with potting area. The property has a swimming pool, tennis court, expansive lawn, rose garden, & motor court. 


Audrey Hepburn's LA House For Sale

Audrey Hepburn's LA House For Sale

Audrey Hepburn's LA House For Sale

Audrey Hepburn's LA House For Sale

Audrey Hepburn's LA House For Sale

Audrey Hepburn's LA House For Sale

Audrey Hepburn's LA House For Sale

100 Delfern Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90077

100 Delfern Drive, Los Angeles, CA

Audrey Hepburn's LA House For Sale


Audrey Hepburn's LA House For Sale

Today's Top Phoenix Luxury Estate 

A photo showing the skyline of Phoenix, looking north.  It shows the various buildings of the downtown area, as well as Sunnyslope Mountain in the background

The median home value in Maricopa County is $248,200. Maricopa County home values have gone up 6.3% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 2.9% within the next year.

The median home value in Scottsdale is $427,600. Scottsdale home values have gone up 3.6% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 1.8% within the next year.

The median home value in Carefree is $745,700. Carefree home values have gone up 1.9% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 1.5% within the next year. 

The median home value in Paradise Valley is $1,621,200. Paradise Valley home values have gone up 1.9% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 1.0% within the next year.

#1      21008 North 109th Place, Scottsdale, AZ 85255 with 5 bedrooms, 6 baths 
and 7,454 sq.ft. is listed for sale at $5,195,000.

This Ranch Hacienda home in the Upper Canyon of Silverleaf has views that take your breath away, and a price to match. Couple this with a desirable, very livable 5 bedroom floor plan, quality finishes, lush grounds and privacy and you have a winner. Lower level has all the important areas, master bedroom, office, living room, family room and kitchen, dining room and large separate guest casita. Upper level has three en-suite bedrooms with a game/family room. Home will work well for family living, entertaining large groups or intimate gatherings. It certainly deserves a look see.




















Today's Top San Francisco Luxury Estate

Image result for San Francisco skyline pictures

The median home value in San Francisco County is $1,249,600. San Francisco County home values have gone up 11.8% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 2.3% within the next year. 

The median home value in Marin County is $1,058,400. Marin County home values have gone up 6.1% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 1.2% within the next year.

The median home value in Santa Clara County is $1,093,600. Santa Clara County home values have gone up 12.1% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 5.7% within the next year.

The median home value in Sausalito is $1,326,600. Sausalito home values have gone up8.6% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 0.7% within the next year. 

The median home value in Tiburon is $2,559,300. Tiburon home values have gone up 6.9% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 0.9% within the next year

The median home value in Palo Alto is $2,728,800. Palo Alto home values have gone up 10.1% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 5.0% within the next year.         
            
The median home value in Los Altos is $2,926,900. Los Altos home values have gone up 6.2% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 3.4% within the next year.         

The median home value in Saratoga is $2,579,400. Saratoga home values have gone up 8.9% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 4.9% within the next year.    

The median home value in Atherton is $6,585,600. Atherton home values have gone up 5.8% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 1.8% within the next year.

#1      21363 Saratoga Hills Road, Saratoga, CA 95070 with 4 bedrooms, 5 baths 
and 5,750 sq.ft. is listed for sale at $6,995,000.



Once in a lifetime opportunity! Spectacular over 2 acre mostly level estate with stunning 360 degree views spanning the San Francisco Bay, Silicon Valley, East Bay hills and the coveted open space vistas, positioned at the top of the first knoll located amongst several of the finest estates in Saratoga and the South Bay in a quiet close-in private setting, walking distance to Saratoga High, Foothill Elementary, hiking trails and the lovely Saratoga Village, also convenient to shopping, commute routes, valley tech centers and airports. Exceptional open bright floorplan with an enormous kitchen, breakfast, family Great room with exceptional views. Separate guest suite on first floor. Exceptional Saratoga schools.




































Today's Top Seattle Luxury Estate

Image result for Seattle  
The median home value in King County is $592,300. King County home values have gone up 14.2% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 5.5% within the next year

The median home value in Kirkland is $706,900. Kirkland home values have gone up 18.8%  over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 6.5% within the next year.

The median home value in Seattle is $697,700. Seattle home values have gone up 14.1% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 5.4% within the next year.

The median home value in Bellevue is $853,500. Bellevue home values have gone up 14.7% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 5.5% within the next year.

The median home value in Mercer Island is $1,380,200. Mercer Island home values have gone up 6.0% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 3.0% within the next year. 

.The median home value in Clyde Hill is $2,636,300. Clyde Hill home values have gone up 19.1% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 7.2% within the next year.

 The median home value in Medina is $2,709,200. Medina home values have gone up 16.7% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 6.3% within the next year.


#1     6454 East Mercer Way, Mercer Island, WA 98040 with 4 bedrooms, 4 baths and 2,260 sq.ft. is listed for sale at land value of $3,300,000.


This waterfront estate site comes with stunning lake and mountain views! Sitting on 0.47 acre land with 89' water frontage and no bank. Dock has jet ski lift. Great schools and private neighborhood. The value is in the land. Perfect opportunity to remodel or rebuild a dream home!













Today's Best Mortgage Rates

Mortgage Rates Hold Recent Lows 
Dec 15 2017, 3:34

Mortgage rates moved slightly lower today, despite movement in bond markets that would have suggested otherwise.  The paradoxical strength is likely due to the fact that bonds improved faster yesterday without mortgage lenders adjusting rate sheets accordingly.  In other words, we began the day with an advantage thanks to lenders being overly cautious yesterday.  From here we could even see a few lenders adjust rate sheets for the better as bonds have managed to find their footing at the end of the day.

To put this talk of "improved rates" in context, many prospective borrowers would not see any difference between today's loan quotes and yesterday's.  Some lenders didn't make any changes.  Others merely offered modest reductions in upfront costs.  It's only when we look at the average lender and consider those upfront costs to be part of the "effective rate" that we can say mortgage rates are lower today.  For anyone looking longer-term and bigger-picture, rates have been effectively sideways for nearly 3 months.

ProductTodayYesterdayChangeLowHigh
30 Yr FRM3.96%3.97%-0.013.84%4.39%
15 Yr FRM3.30%3.31%-0.013.12%3.61%
FHA 30 Year Fixed3.55%3.60%-0.053.35%4.10%
Jumbo 30 Year Fixed4.12%4.13%-0.014.10%4.60%
5/1 Yr ARM3.20%3.21%-0.012.98%3.25%
Today's Top Real Estate News Article
The robust economic recovery of Seattle, San Francisco and a few other tech centers is not something that residents of Las Vegas; Greensboro, N.C.; or Janesville, Wis., would recognize. Since the Great Recession, the divergence among regions has intensified.
As the nation’s economy was still reeling from the body blow of the Great Recession, Seattle’s was about to take off.

In 2010, Amazon opened a headquarters in the little-known South Lake Union — and then expanded eightfold over the next seven years to fill 36 buildings. Everywhere you look, there are signs of a thriving city: Building cranes looming over streets, hotels crammed with business travelers, tony restaurants filled with diners.

Seattle is among a fistful of cities that have flourished in the 10 years since the Great Recession officially began in December 2007, even while most other large cities — and sizable swaths of rural America — have managed only modest recoveries. Some cities are still struggling to shed the scars of recession.

GLOOM.  In Las Vegas, half-finished housing developments, relics of the housing boom, pockmark the surrounding desert. Families there earn nearly 20 percent less, adjusted for inflation, than in 2007.

GLOOM (Las Vegas): Housing lots sit empty along the western edge of Las Vegas. Some cities are still struggling to shed the scars of recession. Families there earn nearly 20 percent less, adjusted for inflation, than in 2007. (John Locher/The Associated Press)

In the decade since the recession began, the nation as a whole has staged a heartening comeback: The unemployment rate is at a 17-year low of 4.1 percent, down from 10 percent in 2009. Employers have added jobs for 86 straight months, a record streak. And last year, income for a typical U.S. household, adjusted for inflation, finally regained its 1999 peak.

Yet the rebound has been uneven. It’s failed to narrow the country’s deep regional economic disparities and in fact has worsened them, according to data analyzed exclusively for The Associated Press.

A few cities have grown much richer, thanks to their grip on an outsize share of lucrative tech jobs and soaring home prices. Others have thrived because of surging oil and gas production.

But many Southern and Midwestern cities — from Greensboro, North Carolina, to Janesville, Wisconsin — have yet to recover from the loss of manufacturing jobs that have been automated out of existence or lost to competition from China, before and during the recession. Like others, they have fewer jobs and lower household incomes than before the downturn.

Those disparities complicate the rosy picture painted by most nationwide economic data. With the nation enduring a widening wealth gap, an overall robust U.S. economy doesn’t necessarily translate into widely shared prosperity.

“There’s definitely a pattern of the coasts pulling away from the middle of the country on income,” said Alan Berube, an expert on metro U.S. economies at the Brookings Institution. “There are a large number of places around the country that haven’t gotten back to where they were 15 years ago, never mind 10 years ago.”

That said, for all the economic might the top-flight cities have gained in the past decade, many city officials and business leaders have become concerned that their success is running up against limits. Surging home prices and rents have made housing unaffordable for many. With cities like Seattle and San Francisco choked with traffic, engulfed by homeless people and requiring ever-larger incomes to live comfortably, quality of life may be at risk.

In the Western United States, inflation reached nearly 3 percent in October compared to a year earlier, according to government data. By contrast, inflation rose just 1.5 percent in the Midwest and New England.

“It’s the first time I have noticed a persistent spread between inflation in one area and the rest of the country,” says Steve Cochrane, an economist at Moody’s Analytics who has studied regional economics for 25 years.

Silicon Valley exodus

Mindful of the financial burden on employees, some tech companies have decided to set up shop or expand where expenses are more manageable. Snapchat and Hulu have put down roots on the slightly more affordable west side of Los Angeles, joining outposts of Google and Facebook in an area now known as “Silicon Beach.” (Similarly, Amazon announced this year it would build a second headquarters equal in stature to its 40,000-employee Seattle complex, in a location still to be named.)

Last year, nearly as many people moved out of Silicon Valley — defined as Santa Clara and San Mateo counties — as moved in, according to a report by Joint Venture Silicon Valley, a civic group. It was the first time since 2010 that the number of arrivals and departures have been roughly equal.

The trend isn’t entirely surprising given that commuting times in San Francisco have lengthened by 40 minutes a week in the past decade, the report said. The price of a typical San Francisco home has reached an eye-watering $1.2 million, according to Trulia, an online real-estate data provider.

Housing costs, inflated by local regulations restricting homebuilding, can act as a barrier to opportunity. They make it harder for people in poorer areas to move for better opportunities. With fewer people able to move to places with more jobs and higher pay, the national economy tends to suffer, economists say.

Among the nation’s 100 largest metro areas, San Francisco experienced the biggest gain in median household income in the decade after the recession began. Adjusted for inflation, it jumped 13.2 percent, according to data compiled by Moody’s Analytics. San Jose, which is part of Silicon Valley, enjoyed the second-largest increase, at 12.7 percent, followed by Austin, Texas, with 8.8 percent.


The Seattle metro area’s median household income rose 6.4 percent gain, from $73,862 in 2007 (adjusted for inflation) to $78,612 in 2016.

By comparison, median household income in the 100 largest metro areas actually fell 2.7 percent, on average. And the income gap between the 10 richest and 10 poorest metro areas has widened in the past decade, Moody’s data show.

Eight of the 10 cities with the largest income gains are “tech hubs,” with heavy concentrations of software architects, data analysts and cloud-computing engineers. They include Denver, Portland, Provo, Utah; and Raleigh, North Carolina.

Pittsburgh has experienced the ninth-largest income gain, thanks to increased tech and health-care jobs. Oklahoma City, where inflation-adjusted incomes are up 5.5 percent, has benefited from the oil and gas boom.

Most Americans haven’t received raises anywhere near that large. Data compiled by Brookings show that 65 percent of Americans who live in urban areas — defined as cities with populations above 65,000 — live in places where the typical household income is still below its 1999 level.

Regional divergence

The divergence between the richest and poorest U.S. cities predates the Great Recession. But it is historically unusual. For a period of 100 years ending in the 1980s, income gaps between richer and poorer cities narrowed steadily.

Economists cite three reasons why such convergence ended. The nature of high-tech work, for one thing, makes it productive for higher-skilled workers to cluster in the same cities.
Elisa Giannone, an economist at the University of Chicago, notes that in past decades, highly paid professionals — doctors, say — might have congregated in cities with fewer physicians to capitalize on the lack of competition and earn more. Likewise, many companies that employed high-skilled workers would move to lower-cost cities to take advantage of cheaper labor.

But her research has found that both trends have been upended by the rise of highly skilled information-technology work. People with such skills prefer to work in cities with their peers. And the companies that employ them seem to care just as much about the right skills as they do about lower costs. What’s more, higher-educated employees typically become more efficient when they cluster together and exchange ideas.

“It’s more beneficial and more productive to go where there are more people like me,” Giannone says, referring to how such workers think. “I don’t want to be left out.”

Jed Kolko, chief economist at Indeed, the job-listings website, calculates that one quarter of tech-job openings in the first half of this year were located in just eight tech hubs: Baltimore, D.C., Boston, San Jose, San Francisco, Seattle, Austin and Raleigh, North Carolina.

A second factor is swelling home prices and rents, particularly where regulations make it harder to build more. People in poorer areas often used move to wealthier cities to find better opportunities. Now, that option is increasingly available only to those with advanced skills or education.

Two public-policy experts, Peter Ganong and Daniel Shoag, concluded in a paper last year that both janitors and lawyers used to fare better financially in New York City than in poorer cities, even accounting for the higher cost of living.

Now, because of rocketing home prices in richer areas, that’s no longer true. Lawyers can still come out ahead. But janitors and other lower-skilled workers don’t.

“Skilled workers move to high cost, high-productivity areas, and unskilled workers move out,” Ganong and Shoag wrote.

In the 10 cities with the fastest income growth, housing prices have soared by an average of 31.1 percent in the past decade, Trulia found. That compares with a national average increase of just 5.1 percent.

One result has been huge wealth gains for a fortunate few. A resident of San Francisco who bought a typical home, paying nearly $816,000 in the spring of 2007 — just as the housing market nationwide was collapsing — has gained $365,000 in the past decade.

In Cincinnati, a homeowner who bought at the same time would have paid just $143,000 but would have gained only $6,500.

“Geography plays a critical role in wealth building,” said Ralph McLaughlin, chief economist at Trulia.

A final factor behind the diversion is that the industries and occupations in slower-growing regions were leveled by the recession. Manufacturing and mining are disproportionately located in red states. So are retail jobs. All those sectors have endured weak growth since the recession.

Job gap

Robin Brooks, an economist at the Institute of International Finance, a trade group, says those job losses have opened a gap between so-called “red” states, which voted for Donald Trump in 2016, and “blue” states.

About 61 percent of blue-state residents have jobs, compared with roughly 59 percent in red states, Brooks found. That cuts against recent historical patterns: From the 1990s through the mild recession of 2001, there was no gap at all.

Despite the persistence of regional inequality, some positive trends have emerged: More tech jobs are moving out of the tech hubs and spreading around the country. Software-programming jobs have migrated to Dallas, Detroit and Charlotte, among other cities, according to Brookings data. Software increasingly plays a vital role in banking and finance, auto manufacturing and retail.

But many of those tech jobs are lower- or midlevel positions, such as technical support and help-desk jobs, rather than higher-paying, cutting-edge positions. Kolko notes that the most highly skilled tech jobs — in such areas as machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence; computer vision; and database engineering — are even more concentrated in tech hubs than are tech jobs overall.

“There’s a spreading out of the tech economy, but it remains a different tech economy in the middle of the country than what you find in the Bay Area, Boston, New York and Austin,” Berube said.

Software may be more widely used, but when it comes to actually inventing new software, “that is still a phenomenon you find in only four of five places in the United States.”

Looking for more information?  Have a comment?  Need a Realtor referral?  Please call, text or email me at 619-944-8749 or furtree @msn.com. Most importantly, have a great day.

Cordially,

Tom Furino