Tuesday, January 24, 2017


Today's Best Mansion and Top  Luxury Estates in Los Angeles, Phoenix, 
San Diego, San Francisco and Seattle Listed For Sale.

The exact definition of the word "mansion" varies but in U.S. real estate terms, it generally defined as single family residence of more than 6,000 square feet. Mansion derives through Old French from the Latin word "mansio". The English word "manse" originally defined a property large enough for the parish priest to maintain himself. The word "manor" comes from the same root territorial holdings granted to a lord who would remain there. Therefore, it is easy to see how a "mansion" came to have its meaning.

Today's Best Mansion Listed For Sale    


#1     917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA 90210 with 6 bedrooms, 8 baths, and 
4,200 sq.ft. is listed for sale at $35,000,000.

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

Exquisite Warm Modern tucked behind the Beverly Hills Hotel. Approx. 12,000 sq ft on a large flat lot and perched above the street. Grand height entry with voluminous and perfectly scaled public rooms designed for large scale entertaining and sophisticated stylish living in a very private exclusive setting. Formal living, dining and family rooms and oversized open chef's kitchen looking out to the beautiful grounds and pool. Fabulous master quarters with large custom his/her closets, personal salon, baths and fireplace. 3 additional suites upstairs. Private and luxurious wine tasting room and basement cellar. Separate staff entrance with bedroom downstairs. World class and timeless design fitting of the most exclusive location in Beverly Hills.

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

917 Hartford Way, Beverly Hills, CA

Today's Top Real Estate News  
The U.S. Cities That Are Gentrifying the Fastest—You’ll Never Guess No. 1


By Yuping Pan 
Realtor.com

gentrified


It’s the hottest of hot-button urban housing issues. In fact the g-word—gentrification—can be looked upon as a virtual catchall for all of the high-decibel talking points about American cities flung about during the endless campaign season of 2016—crime, poverty, upward mobility, urban renewal, and economic opportunity.

But here’s what it really comes down to: poor or working-class families in growing cities being pushed out of their neighborhoods after better-off outsiders move in and substantially drive up the cost of living.

It’s a transformative force that is sweeping through some cities like an economic tsunami. It affects lives and fundamentally alters neighborhoods. On the flip side, long-term residents can benefit, too—particularly homeowners.

Back in the 1980s, Charleston, SC, resident Joseph Watson saw his friends moving out of his depressed Eastside neighborhood because of the lack of opportunity.

“They couldn’t afford to hold onto their properties, and there wasn’t [enough] employment,” says Watson, 67, owner of Mary’s Sweet Shop, which his mother opened in 1968. Local businesses and hotels preferred to hire college graduates, who were few on the ground in Eastside.

But today, it’s a different story. With many neighborhoods in Charleston undergoing gentrification, developers see Eastside as a newly desirable location.

“People come to me daily and ask me if I want to sell my house,” Watson says. Some longtime residents are again moving away, but this time it’s because of the rising prices. And yet for those sticking around, the neighborhood is safer and awash with new retailers, services—and gigs.

“It’s coming back to what it was when I was a little child growing up,” Watson says. “You have people from all over the world living in the neighborhood,” he says. And “there are [new] opportunities for jobs.”

The good news and the bad news:

Welcome to the complicated push-pull of modern urban gentrification.

“It’s a trade-off,” says David Fiorenza, an urban economics professor at Villanova University.

“Whole communities can be displaced,” he says. “But people [also] can benefit from it, because home values and business values go up … and eventually, there will be more jobs and better schools.” If they can afford to remain nearby, that is.

We decided to dive into the heart of the matter by deploying the realtor.com® data team to find the fastest gentrifying cities in the country.

So we looked at cities whose population was 50,000 or more between 2000 and 2015. Then we took a look at the U.S. Census Tracts—that’s data-speak for neighborhoods of 1,200 to 8,000 people. We focused on lower-income areas with home values that had the potential for gentrification (excluding wealthier communities that had already arrived.) Then we compared home values as well as residents’ income and education levels in the years from 2000 to 2015, to assess which cities were seeing the biggest turnaround. (Want specifics on our methodology? Check ’em out at the end of the article).

1. Charleston, SC

Gentrification potential achieved: 62.5%

Median home price increase, 2000 to 2015: $152,100 to $270,000 (+77.5%)

The issue of gentrification exploded in Charleston in 2001, when Shoreview Apartments, a large, low-income housing project downtown, was razed to the ground to make way for an upscale community of single-family homes. Other neighborhoods that had long been solidly African-American working class also saw a shift toward white, middle-class families. Since 1990, Charleston’s black population has declined from 42% to 23%, according to the Census Bureau.

2. Asheville, NC

Gentrification potential achieved: 50%

Median home price increase, 2000 to 2015: $125,000 to $235,000 (+88%)

Back in 2000, Rolling Stone called Asheville “America’s new freak capital,” attracting an eclectic population of hippies, artists, and musicians. Today, tourists flock to its craft beer breweries, and gated golf communities sell homes for prices as high as $6.5 million—but the  quirky, creative characters who once defined the city are vanishing.

Vincent’s Ear, an iconic dive bar where the White Stripes played before they became famous, has been replaced by a high-priced eatery. In the River Arts District, which a city report describes as being “in the middle phase of gentrification,” two dozen artists were displaced in 2014, when their buildings were ordered to close because of fire hazards. The site is currently being renovated, and the hope is that some units will be affordable for artists, according to photographer Jeremy Russell, one of those who were kicked out.

But the newly upscale neighborhood isn’t for everyone. “Some artists definitely moved away [from Asheville] … those who are more progressive, and pushing the boundaries,” Russell says.

3. Washington, DC


Gentrification potential achieved: 39.4%

Median home price increase, 2000 to 2015: $159,900 to $525,000 (+228.3%)

At the beginning of this century, DC Mayor Anthony Williams had ambitious plans to revitalize the city’s depressed neighborhoods. Today, the Navy Yard (home of the Nationals’ new ballpark), NoMa, and Columbia Heights have shed their dingy image and become the new “it” neighborhoods.

“There are a lot more things to do—restaurants, bars, shopping like Best Buy and Target. It’s very convenient,” says Andrew Wiseman, a resident of Columbia Heights since 2007 who runs the blog New Columbia Heights. However, he adds, “the reactions to the changes are really mixed. Families that have been here for generations don’t like it. Local retailers are being pushed out, corner stores are closing.”

4. Portland, OR

Gentrification potential achieved: 33.9%

Median home price increase, 2000 to 2015: $148,000 to $340,000 (+129.7%)

Hmmm … could the trendsetting Portland really have achieved only 33.9% of its gentrification potential? Well, yes, since our analysis starts with 2000, and the poster child for the modern hipster movement was ahead of the curve.

“Gentrification in Portland is not a new phenomenon,” says Katrina Holland, executive director of Community Alliance of Tenants in Portland. “Since the 1960s and ’70s, there has been serial displacement of the African-American community. Now it’s the first time that white, middle-class families are also being priced out.”

Perhaps that’s why lots of “urban pioneers” are ditching Portland for places like Detroit, in search of a cheaper cultural scene.

5. Denver, CO

Gentrification potential achieved: 32.8%

Median home price increase, 2000 to 2015: $162,000 to $316,000 (+95.1%)

We’ve noted it before: The Denver market is hot. Scalding, in fact. The booming tech industry, outdoor lifestyle, and more recently, Colorado’s legalization of marijuana have drawn transplants and starry-eyed developers to the city.

The North Denver neighborhoods of Globeville and Elyria-Swansea were classified as gentrified under our metric, but subjectively, they’re still on the verge. Depending which day you visit the area, it either smells of legal weed—due to a high concentration of marijuana businesses—or dog food from the nearby Purina factory. But three multibillion-dollar developments have lifted property values by 60% from 2013 to 2015, and residents saw their property taxes increase by as much as $600, according to Stephen Moore, policy director for FRESC, a nonprofit organization working with low-income communities.

“Many of our historical black and Hispanic communities are being destroyed explicitly by gentrification,” Moore says. “We are not against investment in those communities, we want that. But we’d like to see more policies that protect the people that live there now, and help them stay.”

6. Nashville, TN

Gentrification potential achieved: 27.6%

Median home price increase, 2000 to 2015: $118,400 to $205,000 (+73.1%)

Every day, the Nashville metro gains 71 to 100 people. The city’s entertainment and health care industries bring in a steady flow of wealthy transplants. East Nashville, where the city’s musicians and artists have long resided, was on the frontline of gentrification.

“The most significant change in the last 10 years was the influx of builders, because the houses here were old and cheap,” says Realtor® Cindy Evans of RE/MAX Choice Properties, who moved to East Nashville in 1980. “After the commercial areas were built, young professionals moved in—for the amenities more than the housing.”

But since the urban core is still relatively inexpensive, Nashville is experiencing intense speculation by developers and investors.

7. Sacramento, CA

Gentrification potential achieved: 26.5%

Median home price increase, 2000 to 2015: $127,500 to $255,000 (+100%)

Thanks to decades of urban redevelopment and to its affordable real estate, Sacramento—just a couple of hours east of San Francisco—is seeing an influx of young professionals and well-off empty-nesters. Midtown, a former hard-knock neighborhood, has been taken over by stylish white-linen restaurants and pricey new condos.

The latest wave of gentrification has also hit Oak Park, a historically black neighborhood where Patti Miller, owner of Patris Studio Gallery, moved 20 years ago.

“It was a ghetto, and rent was really cheap,” Miller says, adding that artists, because they often can’t afford much, “are usually dealing with the grittier side of a city.”

In the past decade, the rents got higher and Miller’s artist friends began to leave—for Oregon, Arizona, and even South America. Miller nearly lost her gallery to developers in September. 

And what’s in Oak Park today? Trendy locales like “holistic spa” Capitol Floats, where customers spend $65 for an hour of relaxing in lukewarm saltwater.

8. Jersey City, NJ

Gentrification potential achieved: 24.5%

Median home price increase, 2000 to 2015: $142,000 to $380,000 (+167.6%)

It wasn’t long ago that downtown Jersey City was more of a punch line than a destination stop, typified by vacant lots and abandoned tenements. Now, its falling crime rate has made it safer for families, and new condos are going up at a rapid clip.

With Manhattan just over the river, Jersey City offers a relatively easy commute and more affordable homes than the fast-track meccas of gentrification nearby, like the more desirable parts of Brooklyn.

The housing market is also driven by wealthy foreign buyers, says Saquib Rahim, a sales associate from Coldwell Banker. “In the rental market, New Jersey has rent control, so renters are protected from huge rent increases. But local businesses are being priced out, for sure.”

9. Long Beach, CA

Gentrification potential achieved: 22.4%

Median home price increase from 2000 to 2015: $179,000 to $455,000 (up 154.2%)

In downtown Long Beach, developers are turning all kinds of buildings—even a former department store—into high-end condos. The previous industrial hub with rundown buildings is now a residential community, with amenities like boutiques, craft breweries, and restaurants.

The average rent downtown is now $2,645, according to Rent Jungle. Who’s paying those prices? A 2016 report by the Downtown Long Beach Alliance showed that the largest number of downtown residents were “metro renters”—young, educated singles who love the arts and spend money on the newest technology.

“Millennials are moving in for walkability and bikeability—there are custom bike lanes and bike-share stations,” says Realtor Jason Patterson from RE/MAX College Park Realty, who represents a waterfront condo building selling for $729,500 a unit.

10. Austin, TX

Gentrification potential achieved: 22.2%

Median home price increase from 2000 to 2015: $152,600 to $299,300 (96.1%)

Many residents tout the unofficial motto, “Keep Austin Weird,” but they may be fighting a losing battle. Condos and upper-income apartments are popping up everywhere, driving up rents and home prices as developers cash in on the city’s trendiness.

For years, East Austin residents have decried gentrification. In 2006, a local nonprofit had about 250 people on a waiting list for affordable housing, but that number had risen to 700 by 2015. The previously forgotten neighborhood with a largely African-American and Latino population began to get attention in the early 2000s. As Austin’s population grew, people from outside the community were drawn to the low rents of the area close to downtown. The result was a wave of new developments, and now East Austin is rebuilding a fancier, more congested version of itself.

* Our methodology considered a Census Tract eligible for gentrification if it had a population of more than 500 people, and both median household income and median home value fell within the bottom 40th percentile of all tracts within its metro in 2000.

Of those eligible tracts, a tract was further considered gentrified if it had experienced a significant increase in median income, median home value, and educational attainment between 2000 and 2015.
The ranking is based on the share of gentrified tracts out of a city’s total eligible tracts. The final list included only cities that had more than five gentrified tracts. 

Data were collected from the realtor.com sales database, American Community Survey, and the US2010 project of Brown University’s Russell Sage Foundation. We consulted research methodology from a 2005 Columbia University study and a 2015 Governing magazine report

Today's Top LA Luxury Estate Listed For Sale 



The median home value in Los Angeles County is $551,600. Los Angeles County home values have gone up 7.4% over the past year, Zillow predicts they will rise 2.6% within the next year.

The median home value in Brentwood, 90049 is $2,523,000. Brentwood home values have gone up 10.5% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 3.0% with the next year.

The median home value in Malibu  is $2,893,700.  Malibu home values have gone up 6.6% 
over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 2.0 % with the year.

The median home value in Beverly Hills is $3,033,400.  Beverly Hills hhome values have gone up 4.1% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 1.1% with the next year.

The median home value in Bel Air is $3,309,900. Bel  Air home values have gone up 5.3% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 1.8% within the next year.  


#1     21160 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, CA 90265 with 3 bedrooms, 4 baths, 
and 3,000 sq.ft. is listed for sale at $11,350,000.

21660 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265

Breathtaking.Bespoke.Beachfront. It's like you're standing at the edge of the world-nothing but blue for miles... that's how you'll feel from the moment you enter this meticulously designed Modern w/sweeping 60ft beach frontge & 270' ocean views. A south-facing cove separates you from your neighbors to the north, ideal for sunbathing and water sprts. Wide decks w/seamless walls of glass bring the outside in for a ultimate California lifestyle. In the spacious,wht lacq kitchen,counter space is bountiful w/a 10ft Calcutta wrapped island. A chefs dream,outfitted in Miele/Sub-Zero, enjoy cooking w/a view. Upstairs 2 oceanfront & 3rd en suite bdrms w/custm closets. Master w/spacious steam shower,boffi fiittings, lrg soaking tub, in-mirror TV. Wide-plank oak flrs throughout-Attention to detail is everywhere. Crestron Smart System,Security w/cameras, ipod/ipad docks. Everything you need at your fingertips. A stroll away from everything,La Costa Beach is redefining location,location,location.

21660 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265

21660 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265

21660 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265

21660 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265

21660 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265

21660 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265

21660 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265

21660 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265


Today's Top Phoenix Luxury Estate Listed For Sale 
.
A photo showing the skyline of Phoenix, looking north.  It shows the various buildings of the downtown area, as well as Sunnyslope Mountain in the background

The median home value in Scottsdale is $416,400. Scottsdale home values have gone up 4.0% over the past year. Zillow predicts they will rise 2.4% withiin the next year.

The median home value in Carefree is $750,000. Carefree home values have gone up 
4.8% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 2.7% within the next year.

The median home value in Paradise Valley is $1,609,500. Paradise Valley home values have gone up 2.7% over the past year. Zillow predicts they will 2.0% with the next year.
      
#1     5837 N Palo Cristi Road, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253 with 7 bedrooms, 9 baths, and 12,261 sq.ft. is listed for sale at $13,690,000.

5837 N Palo Cristi Rd, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253


Palatial Mansion and Park-Like Grounds on a total of 4.73 acres. Majestic use of internal inlaid marble floors and columns, and external artistic carved travertine on a grand scale. This estate was a custom build and offers gorgeous views of Camelback mountain and Piestewa Peak from every balcony. Complete with two guest casitas, resort style pool/spa, two outdoor kitchens, professional grade tennis court, putting green, sand volleyball, kids play area, park-like grounds with carved fountains and benches to enjoy the artistic landscape grandeur and views. too much to list, must see in person. Note: This sale includes 5815 N. Palo Cristi Road, an additional 1.16 acres, parcel 170-02-002B which has a separate guest house of approx. 2200 sq.ft.

5837 N Palo Cristi Rd, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253

5837 N Palo Cristi Rd, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253

5837 N Palo Cristi Rd, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253

5837 N Palo Cristi Rd, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253

5837 N Palo Cristi Rd, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253

5837 N Palo Cristi Rd, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253

5837 N Palo Cristi Rd, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253


Today's Top San Diego Luxury Estate Listed For Sale


The median home value in San Diego County is $529,500. San Diego County home values have gone up 6.3% over the past year. Zillow predicts they will rise 2.4% within the next year.

The median home value in La Jolla, 92037 is $1,497,500. La Jolla, 92037 home values have gone up 6.5% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 2.3% within the next year.

The median home value in Solana Beach 92075 is $1,250,700. Solana Beach 92075 home values have gone up 3.3% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 2.5% within the next year.

The median home value in Del Mar 92014 is $1,675,700. Del Mar home values have gone up 9.1% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 2.5% with then next year.

The median home value in Rancho Santa Fe is $2,675,200. Rancho Santa Fe home values have declined -4.3% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will fall -1.1% within the next year.  

#1     6309 Hartley Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037 with 6 bedrooms, 6 baths, and 6,840 sq.ft is listed for sale at $5,340,000.

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037

Tucked away in the coveted Muirlands neighborhood of La Jolla, this historic hacienda estate rests on just under an acre of lushly landscaped grounds. Designed by master architect, Edgar V. Ullrich in 1937, this extraordinary work of art is a true testament to the Spanish Revival era. Meticulously restored to its former glory by the current owners over an 18-month period, The Smith-Sirigo House was deemed Historical Landmark #480 in 2001 and comes with the Mills Act property tax reduction in place.

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037

6309 Hartley Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037
    

Today's Top San Francisco Luxury Estate Listed For Sale


Image result for San Francisco skyline pictures

The median home value in San Francisco is $1,146,800. San Francisco home values have gone up 1.6% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 0.3% within the next year.

The median home value in Sausalito is $1,258,500. Sausalito home values have gone up 4.8% over the past year. Zillow predicts they will rise 0.5% within the next year. 

The median home value in Tiburon is $2,475,900. Tiburon home values have gone up 2.0% over the past year.   Zillow predicts they will rise 0.8% within the next year. 

The median home value in Saratoga is $2,372,300. Saratoga home values have gone up 0.8% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will fall -0.3% within the next year. 

#1     15141 Sobey Road, Saratoga, CA 95070 with 6 bedrooms, 7 baths, and 
6,427 sq.ft. is listed for sale at $6,450,000.

15141 Sobey RD, SARATOGA, CA


This exclusive estate residence is absolutely spectacular! Constructed in 2002 using the finest materials from Europe and the U.S. 6,427 +/- SF includes six bedrooms, six full baths, a powder room, a generous theater/entertainment room, and an office/library in this warm, light-filled home; you will appreciate the details of its inspirational design. Highly desirable location with an acre lot, offers endless views. It professionally landscaped with lush lawns, mature trees and established vegetation, makes this home the ideal retreat! 

15141 Sobey RD, SARATOGA, CA

15141 Sobey RD, SARATOGA, CA

15141 Sobey RD, SARATOGA, CA

15141 Sobey RD, SARATOGA, CA

15141 Sobey RD, SARATOGA, CA

15141 Sobey RD, SARATOGA, CA

15141 Sobey RD, SARATOGA, CA


Today's Top Seattle Luxury Estate Listed For Sale

Image result for Seattle

The median home value in Kirkland is $594,400.  Kirkland home values have gone up 13.1% over the past year.  Zillow predicts they will rise 5.3% within the next year.

The median home value in Seattle is $609,100. Seattle home values have gone up 13.3% over the past year. Zillow predicts they will rise 4.7% within the next year.

The median home value in Bellevue is $751,300. Bellevue home values have gone up 13.5% over the past year. Zillow predicts they will rise 4.8% within the next year. 

The median home value in Clyde Hill is $2,149,500. Clyde Hill home values have gone up 7.7% over the past year. Zillow predicts they will rise 3.3% within the next year 

The median home value in Medina is $2,353,600. Medina home values have gone up 
10.6% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 4.2% within the next year. 


#1     3002 Fuhrman Avenue E, Seattle, WA 98102 with 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, and 
4,468 sq.ft. is listed for sale at $7,368,000.




Matchless inner-city lakefront! Singular in its concept - precision execution - a poised, aerodynamic motion of movement rising from opposing wedges of design. No walls continuing up... one monolithic steel, glass and concrete piece validating the strategy of passion. Backlit Onyx. 110' super dock... 65' yacht ready. Float plane permissible. Sleek shelter; Urban Coastal presentation unfolds towards Portage Bay. No visibility streetside. Spectacular unending 12 mo. seascape pageantries. Tech wonder!












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Tom

www.laluxuryrealestateupdates.com

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Tom Furino
Phone/Text 619-944-8749
email: furtree@msn.com